Induced subgraphs and tree decompositions II. Toward walls and their line graphs in graphs of bounded degree

Abstract:

This paper is motivated by the following question: what are the unavoidable induced subgraphs of graphs with large treewidth? Aboulker et al. made a conjecture which answers this question in graphs of bounded maximum degree, asserting that for all k and ∆, every graph with maximum degree at most ∆ and sufficiently large treewidth contains either a subdivision of the (k × k)-wall or the line graph of a subdivision of the (k × k)-wall as an induced subgraph. We prove two theorems supporting this conjecture, as follows.

1. For t ≥ 2, a t-theta is a graph consisting of two nonadjacent vertices and three internally disjoint paths between them, each of length at least t. A t-pyramid is a graph consisting of a vertex v, a triangle B disjoint from v and three paths starting at v and disjoint otherwise, each joining v to a vertex of B, and each of length at least t. We prove that for all k, t and ∆, every graph with maximum degree at most ∆ and sufficiently large treewidth contains either a t-theta, or a t-pyramid, or the line graph of a subdivision of the (k ×k)-wall as an induced subgraph. This affirmatively answers a question of Pilipczuk et al. asking whether every graph of bounded maximum degree and sufficiently large treewidth contains either a theta or a triangle as an induced subgraph (where a theta means a t-theta for some t ≥ 2).

2. A subcubic subdivided caterpillar is a tree of maximum degree at most three whose all vertices of degree three lie on a path. We prove that for every ∆ and subcubic subdivided caterpillar T, every graph with maximum degree at most ∆ and sufficiently large treewidth contains either a subdivision of T or the line graph of a subdivision of T as an induced subgraph.

[arXiv]

Last updated on 08/31/2021